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Rob Diaz

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Reply with quote  #1 
I'm curious if the sci-fi fans out there are more into hard sci-fi or soft sci-fi.  Myself, I like them both and my mood really determines how I feel at any given moment.  Some of my favorite hard sci fi would be "Rendevous with Rama" by Arthur C. Clarke (though I like the various sequels better) and Hal Clement's "Mission of Gravity". 

On the soft sci-fi side, "Dune" by Frank Herbert is up near the top of my list, along with "Stranger in a Strange Land" (Robert Heinlein) and of course, "Fahrenheit 451" by Ray Bradbury.

I would be completely remiss not to mention the "Firefly" television show and movie as a favorite in the soft sci-fi category. "Stargate" as well. In fact, there are a lot of shows that would fall into this arena.

What do you like in these categories?
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DC Roe

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Reply with quote  #2 
Like you, I'm fond of both hard and soft sci-fi depending on the day (or hour).

One of my favorites in the hard category is a recent one--The Martian.  At least I guess you'd call it hard sci-fi.  The mood and tone leans toward soft, but hard science is certainly at the book's core.
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Kristopia

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Reply with quote  #3 

I like more "soft" sci fi for the most part, but I did recently thoroughly enjoy reading "The Martian." I also loved Elizabeth Moon's "The Speed of Dark" and an old classic, "Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep" by Philip K. Dick. I also liked the movie "Bladerunner," which was based on that book. There are really a ton of them that I've liked over the years. Currently I've been in a post-apocolyptic/dystopian frame of mind, but I don't like it when they include anything magic - I want them to be as realistic as possible.

 

Except the recent "Mad Max: Fury Road" - which was so much more fun than I expected. Certainly not literary or scientific by any stretch of the imagination.

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Eric R. Jackson

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Reply with quote  #4 
Soft Sci-Fi.   I start glazing over when people start ranting about the inner makings of a warp drive.   The last one I read was actually more of a dystopian story:  Ready Player One.   It had its issues.  Mr. Cline had a bad habit of forgetting about the scene and ranting about things (things I had general interest in, mind you) so I couldn't help but think how good it could have been if he throttled that back a bit.

I also took a look at the Novel form of "Edge of Tommorrow", "All You Need is Kill" and that felt like soft sci-fi other than a HUGE info dump in the center of the book talking about the mimics.   I'm glad I read it though, it was an excellent interpretation of the time loop (and handeled it WAY better than the movie).  Someone suggested it to me because my Fantasy novels approach the 'die and come back at an earlier time' theme.



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Lithakate

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Reply with quote  #5 
The very first SF book I read was Andre Norton's "The Defiant Agents." I was thirteen at the time and my mother bought it for me by mistake. By that, I mean she opened it at random and read, "fresh hoof prints" and thought, "Lyn will enjoy this, it's about horses."

LOL nope, it was about time agents (actually the third book in a series) and from the very beginning I was hooked. I can't say how many times I've read it - at least twenty I would think. It's been about eight years since I last read it, so I think it's time to dust it off and travel once more with Travis Fox and his fellow Apache to the jewel-like disk of gold-brown called Topaz.

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Rob Diaz

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Reply with quote  #6 

I have never read that book. I will have to look it up when I have a chance...though perhaps I should start with book 1 in the series? 

It's pretty awesome when you discover a book "by accident" or by someone handing it to you and saying "I thought you'd like this".  I've had several like that, some of which have been phenomenal finds (the "Foundation" series by Asimov, for example, is one of my all time favorites and I was introduced to it by my 10th grade high school English teacher).

When I was a kid, we lived far from the library so summer was dull and boring (this is back before e-books, mega bookstores, etc.).  So the county library had the Bookmobile, a bus that was lined with bookshelves. I'd ride my bike three miles to where it came to our town each week and I'd find myself disappointed in the lack of sci-fi.  That is, until the librarian in the bookmobile decided to fix this flaw.  She'd put a bunch of sci-fi books behind the desk specifically for me and her suggestions got better as she learned more about me.  It was pretty awesome. She introduced me to the "Dune" series (Frank Herbert) which was awesome but she also failed me by continually suggesting books by Heinlein...as much as I've tried, I've never been a fan. 

In any event, those bike rides...3 miles to the bookmobile with an empty backpack, 3 miles home with a backpack filled with more books than I was officially allowed to check out at any one time... they were awesome. Even though it was 3 miles uphill, each way, in the snow/rain/ice/heat/etc of summer.... haha.

 

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